THE RUN conducted interviews with early state Democratic activists Monday to gauge reaction to Hillary Clinton’s announcement she supports gay marriage.

The 10 best bytes from interviews are below:

  1. “Yes, to a certain extent. But a lot of them have been.  I think she’s keeping her options open. Very open.  I thought it was about time. Good deal.” — Dallas County Iowa chair Dale Creech, when asked if he thought Clinton was late in proclaiming her support.
  2. “I don’t think she had to do it at this point and time.  This issue won’t decide whether or not she runs for office I don’t believe.  If you check that box, that’s one more reason for me to want to support that candidate.” – Linn County Iowa chair Diane Hoffman
  3. “We’ve had those types of people forever, so I guess that’s their choice.  There’s some people who will never change.  That’s her choice.  I do not know [whether it would help her in the caucus].” — Black Hawk County Iowa chair Pat Sass, who insisted she supports gay marriage but was unable to calculate whether the position would help Hillary in Iowa.
  4. “I don’t have a problem with it. I think the nation is pretty much split, close to 50-50 on it.  In a Democratic primary, it probably would be an enhancement for her.  In a general election, I think it would be a 50-50.” – Aiken County South Carolina chair Harold Crawford
  5. “I think she’s still weighing her options but realizing politicians who expect to win can’t continue to isolate minorities. I’ll be interested in her position on immigration.” – Cheshire County New Hampshire chair Sam Hawkes
  6. “Surprised? No, as Secretary Hillary Clinton said gay rights are human rights.  I don’t know if this means she is more likely to run; I think it just means that Hillary Clinton, like most Americans, now believes in marriage equality.  I hope she does run, however, as I will support her if she does.” – New Hampshire national committeewoman Kathy Sullivan, who co-chaired Clinton’s Granite State campaign in 2008   
  7. “By the point the 2016 primaries reach South Carolina, marriage equality will be less of an issue in the Democratic primary.  Serious Democratic candidates understand that there is a growing number of Americans — 58% today — who view marriage equality as a fundamental right, and I assume that will be a non-issue in early primary states.” — South Carolina national committeeman Boyd Brown, a former state representative.
  8. “I was not surprised by the announcement and am pleased that she came out in support of gay marriage.  I don’t think she had much choice given the media focus already on 2016 and she needed to do that to keep her options open in the event she does decide to run.” — South Carolina national committeewoman and State Rep. Gilda Cobb-Hunter
  9. “It’s a great step in the right direction, but we need a lot more people as well in support of it.  I don’t think she’s late to it at all.  I think it’s nothing but genuine on her part.  A lot of people are obviously just now coming around.” — Hillsborough New Hampshire county chair David Tencza
  10. “I see nothing but positive coming out of her backing same sex marriage.  I think she knows there’s a lot of people that back her that would take a second look if they’re struggling with it.  That might tip the scales for them.” –  Tenny Rosfjord Woodbury County Iowa chair